Sunday, December 26, 2010

First Sunday after Christmas

Luke 2:15 (New International Version 1984, ©1984)

15 When the angels had left them and gone into heaven, the shepherds said to one another, “Let’s go to Bethlehem and see this thing that has happened, which the Lord has told us about.”


Into our world, where we usually stay busy and frequently feel tired, God comes. God comes to us where we are, somewhere between darkness and light. God comes to us as we are, anxious and worried, hopeful and blessed. God comes to us as wonderful and surprising as angels singing to shepherds on a hill. God comes to us now as a small baby in a manger.

Let us marvel at the Holy Child, worship on bended knee, and sing with the angels. Let us be blessed by the gaze of the Christ child. God looks at us with love and great joy that spreads to all people.

~ Larry James Peacock
Openings: A Daybook of Saints, Psalms, and Prayer

From page 392 of Openings: A Daybook of Saints, Psalms, and Prayer by Larry James Peacock. Copyright & copy; 2003 by Larry James Peacock. All rights reserved.

Today’s Question

Think of a way God has come to you.

I can't speak for you, but God usually comes to me in the form of a person. Sometimes it's a grandchild who wants to be held and loved on. I have to stop what I'm doing, sit down and allow that child access and my total attention, and probably my lap, too. That's how it is with the Lord.  I have to 'stop', 'be still' and allow Him to have the entire moment or piece of time.  All too often it does feel like merely a 'moment' that I've given to him.

This time of year, it is so easy to remember and even to share about the 'child in a manger' but to forget or ignore the fact that approximately 33 years later He was the Savior on the Cross.  When we read or recall John 3:16, let us not forget to also read John 3:17.

yours, because we're His,
Tamara